Sit and Paint New sessions

We get out and about visiting interesting locations to sketch and paint along the way. Here are some recent pictures of one of our adventures!

The latest program for Sit and paint is here

May 2nd New Walk gallery – 30 Arts Council works titled “Night in the Museum”.

May 9th Burleigh Wood for the bluebells- street parking

May 10th Loughborough Market Place car parking Bee Hive or Granby Street car parks

May 23 Demo night- Sonia Bacchus Still life in the style of the old masters

May 30th Grace Dieu parking in Priory car park rear of Bulls Head

June 6th Swithland Woods – Roecliffe Rd Car Park

June 13th Shardlow – Pub car park Clock Warehouse Pub

June 20th Mount St Bernard’s Abbey car parking Abbey car park

June 27th Demo night – Phill Biggs(bridges) Watercolour landscapes

July 4th Nottingham University Summer exhibition Lakeside gallery

July 11th Wymeswold – Street parking Brook Street or The Stockwell for the green

July 18th Thornton Res parking reservoir car park

July 25th Demo night – Rob Waring Portrait in oil

Aug 1st Stoneywell National Trust, need to book in advance and pay entrance fee, parking on car park and coach provided to house by NT please let me know a week in advance so I can confirm parking etc.

Aug 8th Watermead Park Birstall Leicester street parking Front Street or Church Hill meet white horse pub

Aug 15th Beacon top car park (Beacon Road)

Aug 22nd Demo night – Critique night

Aug 29th New Lount Nature reserve Melbourne road Newbold Coleorton parking in car park

Sept 5th Rothley station Rail yard parking

Sept 12th Bradgate – Cropston Car Park Roecliffe Road

Sept 19th Zouch Rose and Crown car park

Sept 26th Demo night -Jenny Neale Botanical Watercolour

 

Welcome back Time Rose!

On 28th March we once again took pleasure in welcoming back Tim Rose who recreated a truly wonderful street scene from San Francisco in two stunning hours using watercolours.

Tim has the unique ability to bring a scene to life with some deft brush strokes whilst at the same time talking through his subject in a most engaging style whilst giving some most helpful tips on making the best use of light and dark.

Tim also showed us how to effectively use Saunders rough high white paper which he was trying out for the first time on the night! His demonstration involved minimal drawing with paint (manganese blue) applied straight to paper without a lot of water.

He used a fairly restricted palette of colours too working quickly to capture the essence of the subject but not slavishly copying it! His tips were many and included looking at where the light was coming from and the contrasts light created. He used Soft blue for the San Francisco sky and Naples Yellow to great effect.

“Paint with the lights and draw with the darks” he said.

Altogether it was yet again an inspiring and most interesting demonstration by a craftsman who knows his subject both inside and out and so well done Tim for a truly great evening!

Charles Evans Returns!

On Tuesday night we enjoyed the welcome return of Charles Evans, a professional artist and demonstrator from the North East of England. Painting in his preferred medium, Windsor & Newton acrylics. We watched him create a woodland landscape and, after a short break, a beach scene from his beloved Northumbria.

 

Charles has the unique ability to paint, talk and entertain whilst simultaneously delivering advice and very useful tips on all manner of painting topics.

 

The two paintings showed us two vastly different representations of skies: The landscape with a pleasing sunlit summer sky; the beach scene with its dark foreboding storm cloud. Both were painted in a similar way to demonstrate how colour choice can make a huge difference to a painted scene.

 

Charles also showed us how a restricted palette of 8 or 9 colours can help maintain colour harmony and save cost, as any other colour can be mixed from those few colours.

 

He gave us many other pieces of advice during the demonstration including using wet and dry acrylic palettes and a tip on restricting blue within a painting. Stick to one blue he recommended using the same colour in both the sky and in the green mixes, again in order to maintain harmony within the work. For Charles this is invariably Cobalt Blue.

 

Altogether it was a very interesting demonstration by a master of his craft as well as being a very entertaining evening. Thank you Charles!

Christine Adams Flowers in Watercolour

CHRISTINE ADAMS – flowers in watercolour

Our first professional demonstrator for 2017, Christine Adams set the calendar off with a delightful splash of colour giving the illusion of a still life pot with flowers. With her easy style and humorous anecdotes we were in for an entertaining evening.

Christine Adams watercolour demonstration

 

Christine uses Bockingford 140gm stretched in the bath, she likes painting large, the bigger the better. Her love of flowers came from feeling uncomfortable painting landscapes alone in the countryside, and by using real flowers the colour combinations could zing out with her impressionistic style. Using three reds, three yellows and three blues, she creates all the colours she needs and will only use Windsor & Newton because, she says, they are the best. Although she doesn’t like the new tubes because you can’t see what you have got – W&N take note!

A large blank canvas and a pot of flowers should be quite daunting when you don’t sketch out what you are painting, not so for Christine who likes to work flat at home in the studio, as she likes to see how the colours work with each other. For our benefit the work was upright and the composition progressed in sections, wetting the paper with a sponge as she worked and using a large part sable brush, paint was applied capturing the general feel of where flowers would be placed. The composition was as much about where the paint fell and how it looked and the still life merely used as a guide.

There were plenty of tips along the way, like when using blues in the painting they come forward and for foliage which was meant to be behind it didn’t look right, so tone them back. Also when painting the centre of a flower (say) in a bolder colour, don’t use the same colour as a shadow as it just looks like another flower centre.

Christine Adams watercolour

Christine painted a fabulously colourful still life, creating the illusion of flowers, giving us all the inspiration to have a go. Thank you Christine, what a great start to the year.

PS. If you feel uncomfortable about going out into the landscape to paint on your own, then join the Walk and Draw group on Tuesday mornings, get some fresh air and sketch along the way.

Carol Hill Watercolour Landscapes

Carol Hill’s demonstration evening Tuesday 22nd November 2016 –Review by Paul Lockton

Tuesday night was for me full of surprises. Not least because I had expected the routine and mundane – desolate farm scenes in winter are surely not the most edifying or cheery. But instead I found myself inspired and eager to learn from a most accomplished artist and one who is also an undoubtedly brilliant art teacher. Yes, I’d love to be in her class!

Carol Hill knew Derbyshire Dales landscapes and for two hours re-created it’s rustic secrets, even if those were captured in the dubious splendour of a run-down farm one misty, cold autumn morning.

The presentation began with a detailed verbal explanation of the scene and of her use of a quite limited water-colour palette (limited for me who likes to make full use of colours). Lesson 1: to use colours selectively and mix colours on the canvas. Lesson 2: try painting dry not wetted (helped by the use of pre-stretched canvas) all intelligently blended on the canvass not mixed in the palette!

Working steadily progressed down the page helped by some diligently sketched pencil lines, and members saw emerge a gem of a picture in under two hours. Carol’s finishing touches featured the clever use of light and shadow of a lightening-struck tree in the near foreground and at the end her generous donation of the finished picture for the Club to auction for Rainbows. Thanks for everything Carol!

Sue Faulks Demonstration

The interesting demo by Sue Faulks on the 27/09/2016 it was very well received. I feel we all need to stretch our artistic endeavours, so we will be following Sue’s lead next Monday evening at Barrow’s Bishop Beveridge Club. I’ve very cheekily included three of my own works from last month to show we are not all fixated by one medium. My first ever Lino cut, first go at Pointillism and a sketch from the towers of La Rochelle while on holiday. I found, only by using them for it, that Winsor and Newton Watercolour markers were great for pointillism!

Amanda Jackson

Amanda Jackson
Amanda’s demonstration style was excellent, informative, and challenging, most of the Acrylic painters learnt something new. The glazing technique is equally useful for watercolour and oil mediums which benefit from glazes, the slow build-up of colour from multiple layers of transparent washes. The surface shines through these multiple layers causing additive colour mixing which give the results a greater depth.   
Amanda’s use of large brushes and a free style was also worth noting as we can get so easily tied up with the details and forget that it is the composition that counts. Her use of frequent stops and “the 10 metre rule” when she stood back from the work and considered the composition, hue and values of the painting, checking that the overall effect was what she required, was something we all know about but frequently forget.
The mixing of the glazing medium and the colour was interesting as even W&M don’t put that on the cans of medium and it took me a lot of wasted time and medium to appreciate that the ratio should be about 60% medium to 40% colour things us armatures don’t like wasting.
An additional inquiry after the demo highlighted that most Acrylic glazing mediums leave the finished work with a gloss sheen, so if the glaze is not over the whole work then a layer of gloss varnish pulls the work together.

Stephen Ashurst Demonstration

Stephen Ashurst – Oil portrait

 

It was a chilly night in February I know and it is a shame that some of you missed this superb demonstration. With Stephen’s quiet, relaxed and easy manner he explained how he developed his technique for oil portraits, likening it to watercolour in style without the precision.  When painting commissions he tends to use photographs and sittings, but he loves the buzz of working ‘live’ and to a time limit, it certainly gives an edge to his work.

 

David was picked from the audience, he was a little reluctant but succumbed to Stephen’s flattery saying he had such an amazing face!  Working on a canvas board that had been primed once to give a little absorption, a detailed pencil sketch was drawn, about twice the size of the head, filling the board.

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Stephen’s palette is primary colours, 2 reds, 2 blues, 2 yellows and a violet, he didn’t specify which because he didn’t think it relevant.  His brushes he now buys cheap packs from the Works and throws them away, it saves washing them. Lots of Turps is used initially giving the effect of watering down the paint.

 

When the sketch was finished, the first coat of ‘watery’ paint was applied finding the mid-tones in the face.  Initially using a violet as this didn’t mix well later, then introducing reds and yellows, finding the darker and lighter tones, the paint running down the face and giving some interest to the painting.  Trying to pick out the areas like eyes, shadows, contrasts, more and more paint was applied, Stephen described it as having to lose control before you make sense of it.

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After the break several whites were introduced to create lighter colours rather than used starkly and with the primary colours, and less turps, Stephen then placed the colours in blobs bringing out the contours and details of the face.

 

Stephen was really happy and relaxed obviously enjoying painting, you could have heard a pin drop in the room we didn’t realise that we had gone over time.  It was a great success and David was a great model.  Thank you Stephen cant wait to see you at work again.

Stephen Ashurst Portraiture